Traditional Use Studies

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51 Maple Drive, Port Moody, B.C., V3H 5M8, Tel: 604-931-1997, Fax: 604-648-9476, arrowstone@telus.net

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Conducted in collaboration with the affected First Nation(s), the purpose of a Traditional Use Study is to: (1) identify the array and types of Traditional Use Areas within the project area; (2) establish the range of geographic locations for each Traditional Use Area within the project area and project vicinity; (3) determine the potential effects of the construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning of the project on or affecting access to each identified Traditional Use Area within the project area and project vicinity; (4) provide recommendations regarding the management of Traditional Use Areas and access to those areas; and (5) to provide recommendations of measures to mitigate any unavoidable adverse impacts on identified Traditional Use Areas and access to those areas.

A TUS usually consists of three primary avenues of investigations: (1) an archival and literature review, (2) informant interviews, and (3) field visits.

Traditional Use Studies completed by Arrowstone include:

  • Lil’wat Traditional Use and Knowledge of the Gravell Creek Area: A Traditional Use Study of the Proposed
    Gravell Creek Project Area (Arrowstone/Lil’wat Nation 2016)
  • Lil’wat and Squamish Traditional Use and Knowledge of the Wedge Creek, Wedgemount Creek, Green Lake, and Upper Green River Areas: A Traditional Use Study of the Proposed Wedge Creek and Wedgemount Creek Project Areas (Arrowstone/Lil’wat Nation 2013)
  • Lil’wat Traditional Use and Knowledge of the Upper Lillooet River Valley: A Traditional Use Study of the Proposed Upper Lillooet Hydro Project Area (Arrowstone/Lil’wat Nation 2011)
  • Lil’wat Traditional Use of the Proposed Ryan River Hydroelectric Project Area near Pemberton, B.C. (Arrowstone/Lil’wat Nation 2010)

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Map produced as part of the Wedge/Wedgemount TUS (Arrowstone/Lil’wat Nation 2013).

Archaeological assessments are most effective when they are informed by a TUS.